The Influence of Predeployment Training on Coordination in Multinational Headquarters:The Moderating Role of Organizational Obstacles to Information Sharing.

Author
Valaker, Sigmund
Lofquist, Eric
Yanakiev, Yantsislav
Kost, Dominique
Date Issued
2016
Permalink
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12242/574
https://publications.ffi.no/123456789/574
DOI
10.1037/mil0000123
Collection
Articles
Description
Valaker, Sigmund; Lofquist, Eric; Yanakiev, Yantsislav; Kost, Dominique. The Influence of Predeployment Training on Coordination in Multinational Headquarters:The Moderating Role of Organizational Obstacles to Information Sharing.. Military Psychology 2016
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Abstract
Coordination is critical to the success of multinational military operations and may be fostered by predeployment training. We argue that whether such training is related to a high degree of perceived coordination at the individual level is likely to depend on whether individuals experience a low degree of organizational obstacles to information sharing. We examined this using data from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Kosovo Force headquarters (survey: n = 131). We controlled for whether it was the participants’ first deployment, the participants’ background (military or civilian), the amount of time spent in the headquarters by participants, whether differences pertaining to culture and opinions were valued by the organization, the quality of supervisor/subordinate relationships, and the degree of national cultural obstacles to information sharing. The results showed no significant direct effects on coordination from 3 different training configurations: national training, multinational training, and a combination of national and multinational training. However, we found a negative direct effect from organizational obstacles to information sharing on coordination, and support for organizational obstacles to information sharing as negatively moderating the multinational predeployment training and coordination relationship. Qualitative interviews (n = 14) indicated that informal information sharing, and the problems exchanging information from tactical to operational levels could hinder coordination. Interventions to foster coordination could benefit from a focus on multinational training and lowering organizational obstacles to information sharing. Our findings contribute to more precisely pinpointing the types of training that are useful in multinational operations, as well as the factors upon which training transfer is contingent. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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