Is established knowledge about cross-cultural differences in individualism–collectivism not applicable to the military? A multi-method study of cross-cultural differences in behavior.

Author
Bjørnstad, Anne Lise
Ulleberg, Pål
Date Issued
2017
Keywords
Kulturforståelse
Internasjonalt samarbeid
Permalink
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12242/812
https://ffi-publikasjoner.archive.knowledgearc.net/handle/20.500.12242/812
DOI
10.1037/mil0000186
Collection
Articles
Description
Bjørnstad, Anne Lise; Ulleberg, Pål. Is established knowledge about cross-cultural differences in individualism–collectivism not applicable to the military? A multi-method study of cross-cultural differences in behavior.. Military Psychology 2017 ;Volum 29.(6) s. 477-490
1516343.pdf
Size: 140k
Abstract
Preparing for international military collaboration includes raising knowledge about cultural differences. The differences in individualism–collectivism between countries are among the most central aspects likely to impact collaboration. However, are the differences in individualism–collectivism between countries as documented in a significant amount of civilian research (e.g., Hofstede, 2001a) generalizable to a military context? Or are the differences not the same in a military context, as suggested by Soeters (1997) on the bases of a values survey? Quasi-experiments were conducted in a distributed collaborative computer game environment. The study is multimethod, employing self-reporting, observer ratings and direct behavioral measures, and it is the first study of cross-cultural differences in individualism–collectivism in behavior in a military context. By studying differences in collectivist-type behaviors in a sample of military officers (N = 154) in 4 different countries (the United States, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Norway), this study seeks to determine whether the cross-cultural differences in values found by Soeters from a military context are reflected in behavior. The study also includes a values survey using Hofstede’s (2007) measurement tool, the Values Survey Module (VSM), consistent with Soeters’ study. The study is considered exploratory because of a somewhat limited sample. The results from the 6 different measures of collectivist behaviors provide no support for the suggestion that cross-cultural differences in individualism–collectivism are not the same in military organizations as in civilian organizations. Although not conclusive, the results raise doubt concerning the appropriateness of using the VSM in military samples. The implications are discussed.
View Meta Data